Tiverton MP drives world-beating vehicle

A tractor-driving background on his family farm proved valuable experience for Tiverton MP Neil Parish when he visited a world-leading Mid Devon company.

 

Mr Parish was able to take the controls of Loglogic’s best-selling Softrak vehicle, used in many of the world’s most environmentally sensitive areas.

 

He drove the multi-purpose 120 horsepower turbo diesel engine all-terrain rubber track vehicle around the Cullompton firm’s despatch yard and then expertly reversed it back into its parking slot.

 

The Softrak has a ground pressure of only one-quarter of an average human footprint and is therefore used for helping to protect some of the most important conservation areas in the UK and abroad.

 

Mr Parish saw equipment being manufactured for customers in countries as diverse as Germany, Belarus, Holland, and Scotland.

 

He heard from Loglogic managing director Marcus Frankpitt how Loglogic’s export orders had been growing year by year.

 

Mr Frankpitt also explained the difficulty faced by the business in finding adequate engineering training for staff and how it impacted on the firm’s ability to employ apprentices.

 

Mr Parish said: “I was very impressed to see an expanding business here in Mid Devon with products which are recognised all over the world as the best on the market.

 

“I have offered to help Loglogic meet the challenge of growing their export order book and I will also write to the Employment Minister about the apprenticeship and training issues.”

 

Mr Frankpitt said: “We were delighted to host Neil Parish and learn more about how the Government is helping businesses in an effort to meet its target of doubling UK exports by 2020.”

 

Award-winning Loglogic is a world leader in reed harvesting and wetland management machinery and also makes systems for use in forestry and agriculture, for the emergency services, and for the utilities industry.

 

Its Softrak systems are used in places such as the Somerset Levels and Norfolk Broads in the UK, and abroad in countries such as Russia, Germany, Denmark, and America, where more than half of its wetlands have been destroyed in the past two centuries.